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Cherlynn Fagerheim
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Cherlynn Fagerheim
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Best Ways to Vacuum:  5 Steps You May Be Missing



Are you vacuuming the right way? Find out:

1. Make use of the vacuum attachments. Use the crevice attachment (if you have one), and vacuum the edges in each room before you vacuum the entire carpet.

2. Try an odor neutralizer. If your carpet needs a little freshening, use an odor neutralizer.  Here’s a recipe for my favorite homemade version or you can put a few drops of essential oil on a cotton ball and put it in your vacuum bag. This will freshen the air while your vacuum is running!

3. Vacuum horizontally.  For each area you want to vacuum, start by vacuuming horizontally.

4. Vacuum vertically. Once you’ve vacuumed horinzontally, vacuum vertically, too! Yes, you are going over the carpet twice, but this technique ensures that the carpet is lifted and any embedded dirt is removed. Tip: This is especially helpful if you have pets because it will remove pet hair and dander.

5. Have an exit strategy. Start at the furthest corner away from the door and vacuum back and forth until you’re out of the room.  This will give you those beloved vacuum lines that say, “I just vacuumed.”  (Am I the only one that loves those lines?)

Read the whole article

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Increase Your Hampton Roads Home's Natural Light



  1. Use mirrors. Mirrors reflect light, so the more mirrors you have in a room, the more light will bounce from wall to wall! Hang mirrors opposite windows or glass doors to maximize the natural light in your room. Tip: Buy furniture with glass panels or mirrored accents.
  2. Paint with light colors. Light colors reflect sunlight better than dark ones, so a wall painted in cool tones (like gray, cream or eggshell blue) will boost the natural light in the room.
  3. Move furniture. Unless you have some kind of translucent plastic theme going on, your furniture is blocking natural light! Move furniture at least a few feet away from any windows or glass doors so you can let the light shine in.
  4. Ditch the heavy fabric curtains. It’s important to have drapes and curtains, but they don’t need to be made from heavy fabrics like velvet or brocade (which will make the room feel darker and smaller). Try linen or cotton, instead!
  5. Change the door. If you have a solid, exterior door in your dark room, replace it with a door that has a window. If you’re worried about burglary, you can find glass doors at your local hardware store that have high-security glass.
  6. Choose the right shades. Some shades, like Roman shades, block sunlight even when they’re open! Unless you’re trying to keep glare off of a TV, this isn’t a great choice for darker rooms. Instead, opt for blinds that let you better control the amount of light that comes in.
  7. Add a skylight. This is a pricey option up-front, but because a skylight can help naturally heat a room, it could save you boatloads on your electricity bill over time! If you’re ready to take the plunge and add a skylight to a room, hire a contractor for the job – don’t try this one yourself!
If you are moving to Virginia Beach or Chesapeake, give me a call!
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Should You Buy a Used Home Instead of a New House?



As you embark on buying a home, one of the first decisions is whether to buy a new home or a “used” one. Each choice has its advantages, and there is no single answer that works for everyone.

You may be drawn to the shiny, energy-efficient appliances, the great room, and the beautiful master suite offered in a new home. But you may also like an older home’s charm, its increasing value, and its established neighborhood with a canopy of trees.

Here are some things to consider if you’re looking at a resale:

  • Location. Older homes are often found in convenient metro core areas rather than outlying suburbs. Some buyers prefer to select for optimal location first, then remodel the home to make it bigger or more modern.
  • Neighborhood. Many people are drawn to developed neighborhoods for the sense of community. Often, these neighborhoods have mature landscaping and developed trees.
  • Land. In most metro centers, new homes have less land than older properties because of changes in land-use patterns.
  • Price. Generally, used homes are less expensive than new properties.
  • Maintenance and repair. A lived-in home has some wear and tear. Make sure you have a good handle on the working status of all major systems, and hire a professional home inspector to check the house. If electrical or plumbing systems or appliances require repair or replacement, that may be reflected in the purchase price.
  • Home improvement. If you enjoy small repairs and DIY projects, then a used home would be your cup of tea.
  • Traditional layout. Older homes tend to have formal living and dining rooms.
  • Extra features. Lived-in homes typically already have features that would cost you extra in a new house, such as window blinds, a security system, a landscaped backyard, built-ins, cabinets, and so on.
  • Track record. With an older home, you know how much the property has appreciated over the years. Of course, past performance does not guarantee future market appeal, but at least you have some measurement to date.
  • Taxes. Depending on your state, you will likely have lower property tax rates. Also, many older households aren’t required to pay for local bonds associated with new development, such as schools, parks, or road or transportation improvements.

If you are moving to Virginia Beach or Chesapeake, give me a call!

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Moving Your Pets



Preparing Your Pet for the Big Move
Make a point to maintain your pet’s regular routine right up until the moment you leave. If they’re accustomed to a morning walk, make sure you take it. Whether your travels are just a few hours or several days, keep them on their normal diet with their regular food. A common mistake made by pet owners is to bring special treats as comfort food. This often leads to nausea or diarrhea for the pet. Bottom line when preparing your pet for a move: Stay the course and go with what’s familiar and customary.

Things to Consider Before You Move Your Pet

  • Make sure that your pet’s medical records are up-to-date.
  • Bring copies of your pet’s medical records with you.
  • Purchase a sturdy, comfortable transport carrier if needed.
  • If traveling by plane, try to book a direct flight.
  • Prepare a travel bag with food, medicine, water and other essentials your pet will need.

Mode of Transportation for Moving Your Pet
In planning to relocate your pet, you’ll first need to pick a means of transportation. Whenever possible, pick the form of transportation that is least likely to upset your pet. In most cases, moving your pet via car is easiest. If your move is across the country, overseas or a long driving distance, you may want to fly with your pet or use an animal transport service.

Tips for Driving With Pets
Cats should always be kept in a carrier during auto travel. With dogs you have the option of using a restraining harness, available in most pet supply stores. Make sure to stop frequently to allow your pet to exercise and relieve itself (a good rule of thumb is to pull over every two hours). Cats can benefit from the use of a harness and a litter box on long trips. As always, never leave your pet unattended in a parked car, and never travel with a pet in the cargo area of a moving truck or van. This is especially true during the hot summer months, when the temperature in your car can rise to deadly temperatures.

If you are moving to Virginia Beach or Chesapeake, give me a call!

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8 Interior Home Features That Buyers Crave Most in Hampton Roads

Home buyers are sizing up homes with a long list of preferences.

The typical home shopper buys a home with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms, according to the National Association of REALTORS(R) 2013 Home Features Survey.

What feature did home shoppers report they most desire in a home?

Central air conditioning, according to the survey of 2,000 buyers on 33 home features. Central air conditioning was overwhelmingly the top home feature desired by home shoppers. A home that is cable/satellite TV-ready/Internet was also ranked highly.

What else should you be spotlighting on your listing ads for homes that you’re selling?

The NAR survey revealed the following eight interior design features that buyers ranked as “very important” in their home search:

1. Walk-in closet in the master bedroom

2. Ensuite master bath

3. New kitchen appliances

4. Eat-in kitchen area

5. Hardwood floors

6. Granite countertops

7. Kitchen island

8. Stainless steel appliances

If you are moving to Virginia Beach or Chesapeake, give me a call!